CSA: The Year in Review

Posted on November 20, 2011

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2011’s CSA has been over for a few weeks now, and I’ve finally had a chance to compile it all into one delicious slideshow.  Once a week, for 18 weeks, my neighbors and I picked up two shares of assorted Michigan fruits and vegetables.  Occasionally there would be something extra, like a loaf of bread or jar of salsa.  There were also extras we could purchase from time to time, like berries, tomatoes, cream, chickens, and turkeys.  Here’s a list of everything we received in the shares themselves:

  • cabbage
  • red leaf lettuce
  • buttercrunch lettuce
  • snap peas
  • shelling peas
  • basil
  • peppery basil
  • mint
  • parsley
  • chives
  • beet greens
  • green onions
  • strawberries
  • zucchini
  • yellow crookneck squash
  • kohlrabi
  • cucumbers
  • broccoli
  • radishes
  • hot peppers (there were so many kinds I have no idea what they all were)
  • bread
  • cauliflower
  • green beans
  • new red potatoes
  • onions
  • burpless cucumbers
  • dill
  • raspberries
  • yellow pear tomatoes
  • green bell peppers
  • eggplant
  • carrots
  • cherry tomatoes
  • tomatoes
  • beets
  • cantaloupe
  • sweet corn
  • purple bell peppers
  • ivory bell peppers
  • ground cherries
  • more fancy peppers
  • watermelon
  • little pink and white radishes
  • acorn squash
  • pumpkins
  • spaghetti squash
  • butternut squash
  • buttercup squash
  • patti-pan squash
  • delicatta squash
  • salsa

It was really a wonderful selection.  I especially enjoyed the fruit and fresh herbs.  As with anything seasonal, when something came ripe we had more than we could handle.  I dried a lot of things, froze some, and even made a gallon jar of refrigerator pickles.  This was my second year participating in a CSA, and there was less waste than the first.  I have a few new tricks up my sleeve that should make next year even better.

Now, without further adieu, I present to you CSA 2011.

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You know, I never did find out how an Amish family ended up with all of those Star Trek bags…

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Posted in: Local, Production